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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 8:21 pm • # 1 
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Newbie

Joined: 05/07/17
Posts: 17
Hey fellas! Just putting this up, as I ended up finding a small creek that opens up into a larger river (The Coosa). The creek has several smaller pools that look like they would hold fish, and the whole area is pretty wadeable. So my question is when feeling out a new area, how do you proceed? What types of flies do you start off with? Once you get into the coosa the water I'm wading is roughly waist deep, and pretty fast flowing, Just bank sighting I saw a couple of big fish just drifting in the current on a little sand bar, no clue the species though. Any advice is appreciated!

Btw the coosa is known for spotted bass, although it holds stripe, drum, etc.. etc..


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 8:43 pm • # 2 
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Joined: 08/27/15
Posts: 749
Location: New Jersey
My thinking is to fish what you're most confident with in order to limit how much is unfamiliar. I also tend to avoid big flies at first, sticking with size 10 to 14, so as not to spook the fish. Then I'll move up to larger woolly buggers (the universal fly).

That's just me. There's more than one way to skin a cat.


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 9:33 pm • # 3 
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Joined: 10/11/15
Posts: 369
X2 what Knotty said. Use that fly pattern that always works. Resist the urge to change flies often.......


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 9:41 pm • # 4 
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Posts: 369
Oops almost forgot.....if you can avoid wading in the creek ......will definitely spook the fish.My .02cents. Good luck!!


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 10:54 pm • # 5 
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Joined: 02/14/17
Posts: 365
Location: Georgetown, Texas and Corpus Christi, Texas
I have found that wading upstream, vs. down, is always a good idea. Most ambush predators (e.g., bass) orient head into the current to nab whatever the flow is bringing them. I've been told a cast at about 45 degrees to the current is most effective.

For the same reason, eddies, rocks, brush, points -- anything that disturbs the flow of the current or creates a "slack" area is often a likely lie for warmwater fish. All animals like to conserve energy (see, honey? It's not lazy, it's biology!) so if a fish can hang out just outside the current without working too hard and grab something floating or swimming by, that's a bonus.

Also, in my clear rivers, if I wade downstream I'm often dirtying up the water ahead of me.

Bet those big cruisers you saw were carp, but who knows?


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PostPosted: Mon May 15, 2017 11:49 pm • # 6 
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Joined: 04/02/17
Posts: 157
Location: Colorado
TXH2Oman wrote:
I have found that wading upstream, vs. down, is always a good idea. Most ambush predators (e.g., bass) orient head into the current to nab whatever the flow is bringing them. I've been told a cast at about 45 degrees to the current is most effective.

For the same reason, eddies, rocks, brush, points -- anything that disturbs the flow of the current or creates a "slack" area is often a likely lie for warmwater fish. All animals like to conserve energy (see, honey? It's not lazy, it's biology!) so if a fish can hang out just outside the current without working too hard and grab something floating or swimming by, that's a bonus.

Also, in my clear rivers, if I wade downstream I'm often dirtying up the water ahead of me.


As a fly fisher in Colorado, fishing rivers and creeks is what we do. I do what TXH20man said. But I may cast against the banks first, just to see if anything is lurking there, and then start casting upstream and out a little farther doing a fan cast to work everything from the bank to the center, and then I move upstream a few feet and do it again. But you don't need long casts, 20 feet will do plenty. But keep moving upstream, that way you're behind the fish so they won't see you.

I'd throw some big dries, because of the depth of the water I'd want to get their attention, like a #14, to me a #14 is big, but it's all relative, lol, but a #14 or even a #12 bushy dry like a Royal Wulff or a Delaware Adams. But I fish for trout, so you may want something different for the fish in your area, not that those flies won't work, they will, but you may have something better.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 07, 2017 6:17 pm • # 7 
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Joined: 09/13/15
Posts: 79
Take it slow. Check foliage when heading in for bugs, flip a few stones, etc. Observe whats emerging, spinning, etc. In a bit you'll synch up. Stay focused but relaxed.


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