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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 5:41 am • # 1 
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Years ago...I was walking up a creek to get to a bowhunting stand..I stepped on a slippery rock and fell in the water..I had twisted my ankle so badly that when I stood up I vomited...I knew I was in trouble...no one was going to come look for me till at least a hour after it got dark..It was November, very cold, and I was wet...I tied my boot real tight and started to shiver...not good...I reached in my pocket, got out my police whistle and kept blowing a distress signal...1/2 hr. later I heard a voice and it was a neighbor who heard the whistle.when he was picking up his mail...The 3.00 whistle saved my life I am sure...If you, like me, fish alone, and sometimes off the beaten path...carry a signal device...doesn't take up a lot of room..cheap, .and it could save your life...( also carry waterproof matches,(disposible butane does not work well in the cold) a 4" fixed blade knife,(cold hands can make even a easy fold up knife difficult) and for the past 5 years 2 bayer aspirin just in case my heart decides to give me trouble........Rob


Last edited by robgcp on Tue Apr 14, 2009 6:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:52 am • # 2 
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This is a good topic. I'm certain that not many think about the real possibility of a fall or snake bite, and there are few items which we should carry, i.e. cell phone which could prove a life saver.

Les


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 11:59 am • # 3 
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Oh, I take a cell phone now...it is off while fishing...still carry the whistle tho and the other stuff...I might fall on the phone or it might not have a signal...etc....I would hate to be the first person to die of hypothermia due to a dead battery or no signal...But, I take it tho cause that would be best way to get help...especially if it has gps capabilities....Rob....by the way Les, I am using one of the retractors you so graciously gave me to hold my whistle...Image


Last edited by robgcp on Tue Apr 14, 2009 12:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 3:38 pm • # 4 
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Rob,
Great I'm glad you're enjoying them!


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Tue Apr 14, 2009 8:03 pm • # 5 
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I carry my 2 meter ham radio tuned to the forest service frequency when I'm out of cell range. In the summer I monitor the fire frequency's and winter LEO/recreation. If I get hurt I can have a "Air-5" our local search and rescue helicopter over head in less than half an hour.


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Wed Apr 15, 2009 3:24 am • # 6 
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I only posted this subject cause sometimes we, as fishermen, do not consider fishing a dangerous outdoor activity...and I don't know about you guys but sometimes I cannot even find my cell phone or forget it...but a simple thing like a whistle on your lanyard or vest, and we never forget those things...could possibly save your life....nuff said....Rob


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 4:16 am • # 7 
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Location: Canton, Ohio
Since safety is the topic, a wading staff is a "must have", at least IMHO. Mine has saved me from a chilly dunking or two, & possibly other injury.
Mikey


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 4:24 am • # 8 
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Yeh buddy...I always carry a staff while wading...especially now, sort of physically challenged,(bad knees-one replaced)..Thanks Mike...hope some more chime in with safety tips...I really think this is a important subject....Rob


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 5:11 am • # 9 
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They have syringe type extractor kits for snake and other bites available to replace the old razor and rubber cup jobs of yesteryear. You only have a 5 minute window to get any venom out so it helps to be versed in the technique. Cutting yourself is a useless and dangerous method of extraction. Don


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 7:36 am • # 10 
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Thank Z..I did not know that it was dangerous...guess I am stuck in yesteryear sort of...will have to look that up and get what I need...never know about snakes...Never had a snake bite...never want to...I best update tho...cause I intend to up my creek/small river fishing tenfold this year.....Rob


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:37 am • # 11 
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The new extractors are very straight forward, but if their suction can't remove any venom, nothing else will. Don


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 3:48 am • # 12 
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excellent topic! My knees are also gone; I can identify with the situation you were in with the ankle injury; never thought about a whistle, but one will be with me now; I kayak alone a lot so this is a good information thread. The bayer aspirin is a good idea. Its good to think about this stuff even if its unpleasant.
One important tip I learned from a friend down on the coast; always take your paddle and test the bottom before getting out of your yak; for two reasons; stingrays and soft mud. This friend stepped off his yak in ankle deep water to take a whiz and found himself instantly up to his waist in soft mud. He could not extract himself, even with the yak for leverage; it was about 5 hours until a fisherman in a skiff spotted him and got help. They could not get a boat near him as the tide had left out; they had to pull him out with a strong rope. So, beware of where you step in unfamiliar waters.


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Fri Apr 17, 2009 5:54 am • # 13 
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We all have lost shoes in the mud..but, to go in up to your waist..that had to be scary..thank goodness he did not panic..but, 5 hrs in that situation would have been h*ll....Rob


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:56 am • # 14 
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I have sank to my thighs in soft mud before and actually lost both my tennis shoes, but I got out after a tremendous struggle leaving my shoes for the experience. I also once was paddling my yak and hit a mud bar on a lake that was very low from the drought. For awhile i could not move the yak forward nor backwards. Thanks goodness I had a cheap yak paddle with aluminum shaft and was able to continually push and at the same time rock the yak. I got out after a good tussle. The mud could not be seen as the water over it was only about an inch deep. Soft mud is something you need to avoid; much like quicksand.


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 8:36 am • # 15 
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Its interesting, considering my occupation, that I don't take more precautions than I do. I see bad things happen to unsuspecting people, all the time - and understand very well, the ramifications of not being prepared.

However - despite that, my safety gear is minimal, at best. My truck is well stocked - spare parts, fuses, tools, spare warm clothes and a blanket, a Coleman mini lantern and one burner stove, some grub and fire making tools. I carry a snow shovel and chains for all four tires (its an F250 4x4 with lifts) from late October until late May - just in case the weather catches me with a snow storm and a high pass between where I'm fishing and home. Also a fully stocked medical kit - though this has been handier when coming across the odd highway accident scene, than while fishing - but just in case!

Because there is no cell phone coverage in the areas I fish, I don't bother owning one - and through my younger years, when I was single, I'd disappear into the woods for days at a time, with only an approximate location written on a dry erase board on my fridge - ha ha! Now I leave an exact location - with alternates lake or river names, in case weather or road conditions conspire against my original plan - with my Girl Friend - and she is working hard on me to purchase one of these: Spot Locater - and it seems like its not a bad idea - especially considering I can send an "All OK" message when I decide on the spur of the moment to spend a night out (usually when I find the fishing too good to leave!).

While fishing, the only real safety gear I carry is a large can of Caspian pepper spray, when I'm fishing on Vancouver Island - and a 12 guage shotty, slung over my back, when I'm fishing in Grizzly country, on the mainland. The percentage of fishermen that are attacked by bears or cougars, in a year is very, very, very low - but I guarantee that 100% of any that did have a problem, wished like crazy that they had a plan more effective than playing dead or climbing a tree - ha ha!


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 9:26 am • # 16 
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A new term on me, a "shotty"? Sounds like a pistol grip pump shotgun? Don


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 11:15 am • # 17 
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Sorry - sometimes I think I'm just too kool for school - ha ha! I'm glad I didn't call it a gat!

Yeah - "shotty" probably refers to the pistol gripped version - and that would certainly be easier (and lighter!) to pack through the bush. However, I practice, and am thoroughly comfortable with the full stocked version - and prefer it for hitting a quicker and steadier stance (using the stock to pull it underneath my arm and into a firing position) - and getting accuracy on a quartering or quick moving target.

I like my Mossberg 590A1 SP - its smooth, reliable, tough and has the tang mounted safety that, being a left shoulder-shooter, I prefer to trigger guard push buttons. Its a little long - but handles the recoil generated by Federal's ounce and a quarter, 3'' slugs quite nicely (and those loads kick like a mule!).


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 4:01 pm • # 18 
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Big game hunters in Africa often have the bearer carry a 12 gauge with 000 buck if they miss with the double barrelled rifle. I would need the help of multiple 000 to meet a grizzly charge. You know what a bear calls a hiker playing dead? Lunch. I'm sorry, if I had only one finger left on one hand, I would try to poke him in the eye! Don


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 4:23 pm • # 19 
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When venturing into the outback you don't need to out run the bear, just your partner.


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Sat Apr 18, 2009 10:19 pm • # 20 
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Zenkoanhead wrote:
I'm sorry, if I had only one finger left on one hand, I would try to poke him in the eye! Don

HAHAHAHAHA!!!!!!!!! LOL You made my night.


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