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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 1:40 pm • # 21 
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Joined: 02/13/09
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Quote:
I would need the help of multiple 000 to meet a grizzly charge.
Interestingly - buckshot (neither OO or SSG/OOO) is not recommended against Grizzly charge. A Grizz's skull is like the front glacis plate of a tank - thick and sloped. Buckshot just doesn't carry enough velocity or energy to penetrate - and it has proven to be a bad choice in actual feild conditions. Even bears missing eyes have finished the charge and done a little chewing.

Slugs are the only way to go - and the larger than normal 1 1/4 ounce slugs are recommended for the added energy transfer. Heavy slugs and lots of practice - because with heavy slugs comes heavy recoil - and follow up shots are going to need to be on target.

I carried a 3006 rifle in grizzly country, for a number of years (an M1 Garand) - but as the round count increased, the number of jams also went up - and that just won't fly when it absolutely has to go bang when the trigger is pulled - ha ha! Still one of my favorite rifle range rifles, though!


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 2:36 pm • # 22 
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Posts: 2056
Good to know. Don


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 10:22 am • # 23 
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Joined: 02/15/09
Posts: 132

I usually try and carry at least a very small med kit with the very basics in my fishing pack. I've added super glue and benadryl to it. The super glue is good for cuts and the benadryl in case of the dog or myself gets bit by a venomous snake. I also take a bic lighter and wrap several feet of duct tape around it. I think this is better than mole skin at covering a blister on trail. I have a bigger kit I take when several of us are going on extended pack in trips.

One lesson in safety I learned the hard way was to crimp your barbs and carry needle nose pliers w/ wire cutters. While on a smallmouth fish/float trip I got a very small treble hook in my thumb. (I was trying to unhook a nice fish while standing up in a canoe and running some rapids on the Buffalo River) I couldn't get it out with my fishing pliers. I ended up having to wear it as jewelry for over an hour until I found someone with side cutters. Note: after cutting it and getting it out I sterilized the wound and sealed it up with superglue. On the trip home the next day I pealed off the glue and applied antibiotic ointment.



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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Mon Apr 20, 2009 11:30 am • # 24 
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Joined: 11/17/08
Posts: 5437
Geenoefly,
I've seen some nasty home-made barbed hook earrings -luckily none adorned me.

Les


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 9:45 am • # 25 
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Joined: 02/13/09
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Quote:
One lesson in safety I learned the hard way was to crimp your barbs and carry needle nose pliers w/ wire cutters.
One extra bit of kit I carry in my chest pack, is three feet of 80lb test Dacron (fiber type line - mostly used for Halibut fishing in these parts) for hook removal.

I was a Salmon fishing guide for a number of years - and found that guests showing up with no "sea legs", would often get a hook stuck in their hand (4/0 or 5/0 barbed hooks!) while trying to gain control of the leader in a wind and a lively sea-way.

This happened often enough that I got to try most of the accepted ways of removing hooks from flesh - ha ha!

By far the best way I tried, was the "Dacron Method" - as it removed even large, barbed hooks with the least mess and pain.

To use; loop the dacron around the bend of the offending hook - with the other hand, push straight down (hard!), against the flesh, on the eye of the offending hook - with a sharp pull (and follow through, thats important!) pull up and out with the dacron looped around the bend of the hook.

Voila! Pushing on the eye, and the up and out angle of the pull allow the hook and barb to exit in exactly the way it entered. It works everytime, hurts a lot less than pushing a hook on though the flesh, so the barb can be cut off - and will allow the hooked fisherperson to continue fishing, as only a very small hole is left in the flesh.


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 10:37 am • # 26 
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I have used that method before and it is so quick and relatively painless...When I have had to do it for friends who were hooked I explain the method then tell them on 3 I am going to do it...I go on 2 makes them a bit angry...but keeps them from jerking.....Rob


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 11:19 am • # 27 
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I saw a good video on u-tube showing a guide pulling a 5/0 or bigger out of a guys hand....good stuff


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 11:47 am • # 28 
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Joined: 02/13/09
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Quote:
When I have had to do it for friends who were hooked I explain the method then tell them on 3 I am going to do it...I go on 2 makes them a bit angry...but keeps them from jerking

Ha ha - nice one! That does work well, and I should have mentioned it. Less damage is done when the muscle the hook is impaled into is relaxed than when its flexed. A little looser around the hook, I guess.

Quote:
I saw a good video on u-tube showing a guide pulling a 5/0 or bigger out of a guys hand....good stuff
I looked it up - it shows it pretty well. Be aware, there is some swearing, though.

Hook removal technique.


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 Post subject: Safety First
PostPosted: Wed Apr 22, 2009 8:57 am • # 29 
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Joined: 11/23/08
Posts: 59
I carry a small home made survival kit. Like Hew, I tend to fish outside of cell phone coverage so if crap happens, I plan to be able to survive until someone figures out I'm missing and comes looking for me.

My survival kit is all contained in a stainless steel quart sized water bottle (which could double as a pot/kettle). In it, I've put the following (in no particular order):

Water purification tablets
Needle and thread kit
A large orange plastic garbage bag
Medium sized swiss army knife
Antibiotics (Cipro)
Aspirin/Tylenol
small bandages + bandana
3 days of my prescription medication
2 cup-a-soup packages
6 Oxo cubes
Waterproof and Windproof Matches
Fire starter kit
Compass
Whistle
Headlamp style LED light with spare batteries
25 metres of 60 kg breaking strength chord.

I've also got a few "emergency" bars of Kendall Mint Cake (high energy) in my vest.

I've never been in an emergency situation and "had" to use my kit, but I have used the matches to start a fire to dry my clothes after a dunking.


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