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 Post subject: 1st Tenkara Outing
PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2018 8:15 pm • # 1 
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Joined: 09/17/12
Posts: 141
Location: Washington State
I landed some real nice fish; one kinda skinny 14er+ male Coastal Cutthroat with kitty teeth that kept snagging the fine mesh in my DRAGONtail (Shimano-style) Damo net, using a #10 bead head Antron Kebari, and a couple of smaller fish in the 7" to 10" range on a Royal Coachman Kebari. The following week I landed a few 11-13ers on an Akiyamago dry (with a silk eye) I tied up. Fun!
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Last edited by Brian_Miller on Thu May 24, 2018 1:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: 1st Tenkara Outing
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 2:25 am • # 2 
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Joined: 06/13/16
Posts: 754
Location: North Port, Florida
Great first trip! Ain't it fun trying to figure out how to land that first fish on a tenkara rod?


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 Post subject: Re: 1st Tenkara Outing
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2018 9:12 pm • # 3 
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Joined: 08/27/15
Posts: 780
Location: New Jersey
Nice fish and kebari. Cool how western fly patterns are being adapted to tenkara style flies.

My tenkara rods have been ignored for too long. Time to break them out again.


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 Post subject: Re: 1st Tenkara Outing
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 10:18 am • # 4 
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Joined: 05/31/17
Posts: 38
Location: New York City
The Akiyamago kebari uses dry fly hackle but is generally fished wet. With no floatant and no false casting, it will float for the first drift or two, but will then fish just a few inches under the surface. The stiff hackle helps resist the pull of the line, helping to keep the line off the water's surface. With a short line and a high rod tip, you can keep it at the surface, and if fished downstream you can skate it on the surface. Without floatant, though, you can fish it on the surface one cast and sink it in a plunge pool the next. It is a very versatile fly.

Early on, nearly all the tenkara flies that anyone in the US knew about were the sakasa style (hackle slanting forward). Many Japanese tenkara flies have upright dry fly hackle but we here are only recently giving them the attention they deserve.


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 Post subject: Re: 1st Tenkara Outing
PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 1:25 pm • # 5 
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Joined: 09/17/12
Posts: 141
Location: Washington State
Chris Stewart wrote:
The Akiyamago kebari uses dry fly hackle but is generally fished wet. With no floatant and no false casting, it will float for the first drift or two, but will then fish just a few inches under the surface. The stiff hackle helps resist the pull of the line, helping to keep the line off the water's surface. With a short line and a high rod tip, you can keep it at the surface, and if fished downstream you can skate it on the surface. Without floatant, though, you can fish it on the surface one cast and sink it in a plunge pool the next. It is a very versatile fly.

Early on, nearly all the tenkara flies that anyone in the US knew about were the sakasa style (hackle slanting forward). Many Japanese tenkara flies have upright dry fly hackle but we here are only recently giving them the attention they deserve.
Thank You Sir for the tips on different ways to present an Akiyamago fly! I had sprayed it with silicone boot waterproofing and was presenting it as a dry fly; the Coastal Cutties were eating it up.


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