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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 4:24 pm • # 1 
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I see a lot of discussion regarding which reels balance which rods and am just curious to know if everyone checks the balance in a similar fashion.

I mount the reel, string the rod up, and just pull enough line through so that the fly line touches the floor when I'm standing and holding the rod horizontally at about my waist. I'm like the balance point to be right around an inch from the front end of the cork grip--about where my index finger is when my thumb is in casting position.

In the case of my new 7'6" Orvis 1 wt, I'd like it to balance where the red arrow is. Right now it balances a couple inches forward of that with the 3.8oz Lamson reel in the photo. I have plenty of room on the reel to add backing to move the balance back a hair. With the 3.2oz Orvis BBS I the balance point is even further forward meaning the reel is lighter than *my* ideal weight for this rod.
Image

I think I read the stringing up the rod part in a Dave Whitlock book that came with my first rod way back when. It makes a difference.

Jerry


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 4:41 pm • # 2 
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Jerry,
I try for a balance point from the last 2" of the grip to just in front of the hook keeper location depending on the weight rating of the rod in question.



Doug


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 8:25 pm • # 3 
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I try to use reels that measure four ounces on a 7.5' rod, heavier for longer, and lighter for shorter...Yeah, this is really subjective.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 05, 2008 9:09 pm • # 4 
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to be honest, I don't really pay much attention to where my rod balances. I just buy the reel that fits my needs the best, and go from there.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 06, 2008 4:55 am • # 5 
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Jerry, I like to have a balance point as you describe. A reel that's too heavy kind of throws my casting stroke off.

J.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 01, 2021 1:53 pm • # 6 
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Sounds like you are testing the rod balance correctly. Instead of worrying about finding a reel with the specific weight, you may want to checkout fly rod balancers. It lets you add the correct weight to your rig in just a few seconds.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 02, 2021 2:45 pm • # 7 
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I don't really balance them either in any way other than holding the rigged setup with line off the reel and seeing if the reel wants to dip. If it does, that's bad - light reels help casting, heavy ones cause your tip to swing like a pendulum and will kill a good cast. If the rod tip dips, no big deal. If it's a trout rod and the tip dips aggressively... excellent :D

In the old days, even now sometimes, tournament casters often had no reel at all but instead laid the line out in big open coils. I've done that, and it feels weird at first but you can definitely cast better. It'll also tell you how good a caster you really are.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 10, 2022 3:23 pm • # 8 
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I've always heard to balance the rod with a finger and the grip, BUT...have since started balancing my rod based on the average distance I will be casting with the rod. Essentially I want a balanced rod when I have line in the water as this is how I will be holding the rod most of the day. Using this method, I balance the rod so the reel is typically heavier than expected to get to this balance point. Otherwise, you will be tip heavy when the line is in the water.

Hope this helps,
Aaron


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 11, 2022 1:56 am • # 9 
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Sasquatch wrote:
I've always heard to balance the rod with a finger and the grip, BUT...have since started balancing my rod based on the average distance I will be casting with the rod. Essentially I want a balanced rod when I have line in the water as this is how I will be holding the rod most of the day. Using this method, I balance the rod so the reel is typically heavier than expected to get to this balance point. Otherwise, you will be tip heavy when the line is in the water.

Hope this helps,
Aaron


What he said!


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 22, 2022 1:23 pm • # 10 
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It's all in the feel. Where do you hold the rod when you cast? It should feel balanced ,almost like it has no weight. Like your hand is the fulcrum on a lever or seesaw. You can make it right by the placement of the lined reel or the size of the reel. Then practice casting it with that placement, then readjust!Have fun! Cheers,Chet


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 11:23 am • # 11 
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And all of that balance theory goes out the door with the amount of line out or on the reel. It is tip heavy at the start of backcast and tip light at the forward cast. Also if line is in the water, take into consideration the resistance caused by water drag


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2022 4:36 pm • # 12 
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When I balance a rod, I have 10’ of fly line out the tip, Is slightly butt heavy when gripped in my normal spot when casting. With it set up this way. I have 17-20’ to my first fly when high sticking nymphs in a seam r pocket.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 24, 2022 5:57 pm • # 13 
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The amount of line out is relatively insignificant. A 2,3,4 wt line weighs around an ounce. So, if you have 30-40 ft of line on the water,the water takes care of that 1/3 ounce. You don't have to hold that miniscule mass up,except to cast. When you cast the flex of the rod on the dead cast adds force to balance the line.And the force vector of the line during the cast is perpendicular to the swingweight. All hypothesis based on observation. I am sure the big companies like Shimano/Loomis have computer software to create models of this. Nasa ,too!Cheers,Chet


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